Booze Traveler: Season 3 Sneak Peek

Jack is BACK! Get ready for all-new Booze Traveler adventures with a quick look at season 3.  

Photos

Barcelona: Bobby Gin

Barcelona: Bobby Gin

Alberto Pizarro, bar manager at Barcelona’s Bobby Gin, notes that Spaniards’ love for G&Ts is a many-splendored thing: “It’s a refreshing drink for hot summers; it’s a long drink that suits the Spanish taste; it’s used as an appetizer but also a digestive and a fancy drink.”

Bobby Gin’s most popular version is made with Hendrick’s and lemon thyme; bargoers also clamor for cocktails with Modernessia, a Spanish gin, infused with goji berries. (Click here for a sneak peek of Jack Maxwell’s trip to Barcelona.)
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London (and Iceland): Martin Miller's Gin

London (and Iceland): Martin Miller's Gin

Martin Miller’s Gin became the world’s first “super-premium” version of the spirit in the late ‘90s, when its namesake (once called “the Richard Branson of the antiques world”) resolved to topple vodka in his countrymen’s affections. Distilled in the UK (in ‘Angela,’ a century-old pot still) and combined with volcanically filtered water on a fjord in western Iceland, Martin Miller’s has admirers wherever G&T is spoken. Find it in its second home at Slippbarinn, on the harbor in Reykjavik (and find more of Jack Maxwell’s Icelandic favorites here); to reimagine classic cocktails, reach for 9 Moons, a barrel-aged gin the Martin Miller’s team decided to develop after mixologists at a Scottish gastropub in New York City (are you following all the globe-trotting here?) barreled it themselves. Recreate that “aha!” moment with a new take on an Old Fashioned (2 oz. 9 Moons gin, 1 tsp water, 2 dashed Angostura bitters, 1 sugar cube).  960 1280

  

Chicago: Letherbee Gin

Chicago: Letherbee Gin

Letherbee’s Brenton Engel began distilling in Chicago back in 2007, when he cooked up “Illinois Joy”—moonshine—in his basement. These days, he and his team produce barrel-aged absinthe, Fernet, Bësk, and a take-no-prisoners flagship gin; call it anti-craft craft distilling. “Our ‘botanical-forwardness’ is actually a direct reaction to all the new American gins that were starting to come out years ago which, in my opinion, were mostly too light, floral, whimsical, fruity and expensive,” he says. “I wanted to make a robust gin that could stand up to the bold food ingredients I was using in my cocktails.”

Letherbee also distills limited-edition Vernal and Autumnal gins; this fall’s Bloody-Mary-ready, borscht-inspired run of 2,500 bottles is made with beets, dill, black pepper, caraway and cumin. The beauty pictured here, in turn, is the Thai Derby from Melody Nelson Bar in Berlin (6 cl Letherbee gin, 4cl lime juice, 2cl honey syrup, and a dash of Angostura bitters, shaken, strained, and garnished with sage and a pinch of Ceylon cinnamon). Thirsty for more in Chicago? Visit Gold Star Bar, one of Jack Maxwell’s favorite cash-only dives.
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Amsterdam: Razmataz

Amsterdam: Razmataz

Gin-lovers in Amsterdam would do well to head to the Oud-West neighborhood and make themselves comfortable at Razmataz, a bar and restaurant which boasts more than 50 varieties of gin and two spins on G&T exploration: a professional-led tasting for large groups and a new, DIY version in which tasters are turned loose with three varieties of gin and an array of mixers and garnishes. Bestsellers and house favorites include Bobby’s (a Dutch gin that debuted in 2014), Dodd’s (a small-batch gin from London with lots of cardamom) and G&Ts finished with a splash of vermouth. (Click here to follow Jack Maxwell to Amsterdam and across the Netherlands.) 960 1280

  

Alameda, CA: St. George Terroir Gin

Alameda, CA: St. George Terroir Gin

The artisan distillers at St. George put northern California in a bottle with their Terroir gin; Douglas fir from a ranch in nearby Mendocino gives the spirit its signature bouquet, and wok-roasted coriander adds an earthy note reminiscent of the wild scrub in the Bay Area’s foothills. For a spot-on autumn cocktail, the team suggests echoing the gin’s herbaceous notes in a Collins (gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and soda) garnished with rosemary, sage or fresh California bay laurel; to follow the gin to its source, reserve a spot at one of the distillery’s tours or tastings. For the ultimate taste of the Golden State, try Karl Steuck’s “To Grandma’s house we go,” pictured here (2 oz. St. George Terroir gin, 1 oz. Dolin Blanc, and 2 dashes Angostura Orange bitters, garnished with a Yellow Chartreuse-infused fig). 960 1280

  

Madrid: Gin Club

Madrid: Gin Club

Gin Club, a bar that shares space and patrons with Mercado de la Reina, was one of Madrid’s first gin palaces; it’s also one of its best. In G&Ts, “Madrileños [natives and inhabitants of Madrid] have discovered a drink they love as much as wine and beer. Increasingly gin tonics appear as accompaniments to lunch or dinner; it is not unusual to see the marriage of our burger with gin and tonic,” says Gin Club’s Raúl Gómez. Martin Miller’s Gin reigns supreme at the Club, he reports; Bulldog—also a London Dry—is another favorite. What differentiates a gin tonic in Spain—a gin tonic at the Gin Club—from those one would find elsewhere? “The love with which we make them, of course.” 960 1280

Photographer: Emilia Brandao  

Caithness, Scotland: Rock Rose Gin

Caithness, Scotland: Rock Rose Gin

Martin and Claire Murray drew inspiration for their Rock Rose Gin from Viking scavengers, as one does; a millennium ago, the savage travelers harvested rose root (which the Murrays now grow in their distillery garden) to give them strength for long journeys. “We only use a small amount in our gin,” says Claire, “as it is actually very astringent and is quite a powerful flavour—we only want to add a hint!” The Murrays can’t reveal the identity of the woman who gave her name to Elizabeth, their traditional copper pot still, in print—but she’ll happily tell the story in person. Do she and Martin have a favorite way to serve their gin? “As husband and wife we can’t always agree on things and we each have our perfect serve! I like it best with a curl of orange, and Martin [likes it] with a sprig of rosemary. I think it shows that garnish is down to personal preference and what notes you enjoy and want to pull out as a dominant flavour in your gin.” If you’re inspired to pluck a bit of wild rose root as your garnish, watch your step out on the Scottish cliffs: “it can be difficult to reach!” (Follow Jack Maxwell’s travels in Scotland here.) 960 1280

Mike Denman  

Brooklyn: Greenhook Gin

Brooklyn: Greenhook Gin

Brothers Steve and Philip DeAngelo put a Brooklyn spin on gin at their distillery in Greenpoint, where they use New York-grown wheat in their American Dry Gin and macerated Long Island Beach Plums (once used as currency by local Native American tribes) in their one-of-a-kind Beach Plum Gin Liqueur; their overproof Old Tom, in turn, pays tribute to the robust Genevers that fortified Dutch settlers in the 18th century. Greenhook Gin makes appearances in bars and bottle shops across New York; if you head north along the Atlantic, Bar Sugo in Norwalk, CT offers Greenhook Gin as a winter warmer in its Negroni Verde, pictured above (1 oz. Greenhook Gin, 1 oz. Suze, 1oz. Cocchi Americano, 1/4 oz. Blood Orangecello; stir with ice until chilled, then strain into a rocks glass over fresh ice and garnish with orange zest). 960 1280

  

Greater Manchester, UK: The Old Bell Inn

Greater Manchester, UK: The Old Bell Inn

The Old Bell Inn, an 18th-century former coaching inn in Saddleworth, broke the Guinness World Record for the greatest number of gins commercially available back in 2014 (with 404 total); owner Philip Whiteman says that they now have 775 different gins. It’s no trouble to pick favorites among them, reports mixologist Sam Winterbottom: “Most of the staff have one to recommend and luckily we have a diverse taste so no one tastes the same thing twice.” When asked for an unusual choice, Winterbottom recommends the first gin produced locally in Manchester: “The Thomas Dakin [pictured above] has a unique savory flavor with 11 botanicals, including horseradish, based on a 1761 recipe, definitely more obscure.” Has he ever met a gin he doesn’t like? “The non-alcoholic one would be high on the list!” 960 1280

  

Wellington, South Africa: Jorgensen's Gin

Wellington, South Africa: Jorgensen's Gin

Craft distillation in South Africa suffered a fatal blow in the 1960s, when the then-Nationalist government revoked private distillation licenses and concentrated rights among a handful of big companies. That underwent a sea change in 1994, the year Nelson Mandela became president, South Africa adopted a new constitution—and Dawn and Roger Jorgensen began distilling spirits with local ingredients on their family farm in Wellington, 45 minutes outside of Cape Town. They produce their delicate, small-batch gin with local ingredients such as juniper grown in South Africa, “Grains of Paradise” from Ghana, naartjie, (a native citrus), and Cape lemon peels. These days, the premium microdistillation movement is gaining momentum—and Roger is thrilled to have company. “It is gratifying the market recognizes us all as providers of unique spirits that tell an African plant story. Gin is like no other spirit in the way that it can accurately describe the terroir or local environment.” Visitors who call ahead are welcome to come out to the farm for a tour and a tasting; look for Jorgensen’s Gin at top Cape Town hotels like Cape Grace and The Table Bay, at local gin bars (“of which The Gin Bar in Wale Street is a leading light,” says Roger), and online. (Click here for Jack Maxwell’s adventures in South Africa.) 960 1280

  

Berlin: Monkey Bar

Berlin: Monkey Bar

Berlin’s most enterprising gin enthusiast, the late Montgomery “Monty” Collins, was an Englishman—a wing commander in the RAF, more specifically, who came to the city after World War II as an administrator. Thirsty for the spirit he left back home, he developed his own gin recipe and named it for Max, his favorite Monkey at the Berlin Zoo. Black Forest Distillers consider that recipe the heart and soul of their own potion, now one of the leading gin brands in Germany. The best place to enjoy it, of course, is Berlin’s Monkey Bar, which perches on the 10th floor of the 25hours Hotel Bikini Berlin...and has an unparalleled view of the zoo. To enjoy gin as one does in Deutschland, prepare your own batch of Monkey Bar’s green apple gin (whizz one apple with a bottle of gin in a blender, let it rest for an hour and strain it through a cloth), or, if you find yourself at the bar, order a Rafiki (pictured here, with gin, rhubarb juice, rosemary, lemon balm, lemon juice and sugar syrup). 960 1280

  

Oslo: Vidda Tørr Gin

Oslo: Vidda Tørr Gin

Local, independent distilling is coming back to Norway (where, until last year, the State Wine Monopoly reigned supreme). The team at the brand-spanking-new Oslo Håndverksdestilleri decided to make a Norwegian mountain gin that celebrated the Scandinavian tradition of foraging after a five-hour hike that culminated in the discovery of an ice floe in a mountain lake—which they wrapped in a jacket, hauled back home, and chopped into chunks for “one of the most beautiful G&Ts [we’d] ever had,” they remember. Vidda (“mountain plateau”) Tørr (“dry”) is infused with wild local botanicals like meadowsweet and heather; “we wanted to capture in a bottle the feeling of the mountain walk, the smells and taste of the mountain flora, and [the] experience of the extreme Norwegian climate.” To taste the winner of Vidda’s first cocktail competition in its home country, head to Lysverket Bar in Bergen and ask for bartender Elias Vega’s Blossoms and Fjords—Vidda, Marka (the distillery’s bitters), lemon juice, honey and sugar, garnished with a lemon twist. 960 1280

  

Sweet Aztec Corn Punch: Post 390, Boston

Sweet Aztec Corn Punch: Post 390, Boston

Having a hard time letting go of backyard barbecues? Say your goodbyes in Boston with a creamy cocktail that makes the most of the harvest. “This late-summer punch infuses tequila, saffron, cilantro and lime with sweetcorn,” Post 390’s beverage manager, Jason Percival, explains. “Topped with lime, agave, Horchata, milk and egg whites, this is the perfect clarified cocktail to celebrate the end of summer and start of fall.” 960 1280

  

Kina Kir: Harvest, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Kina Kir: Harvest, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Harvest in Cambridge spans the seasons with an elegant, cava-based twist on a French classic; with Ketel One vodka, St. Germain and Lillet Rose, this sparkling cocktail is a crowd-pleaser. “I think the Kina Kir is a great fall drink because it acts as a bridge between summer and winter cocktails, refreshing and floral but also with enough body to stand up to colder weather," beverage director Brahm Callahan says. 960 1280

  

Pear Mon Frère: Bourbon Steak at Four Seasons Hotel, Washington, D.C.

Pear Mon Frère: Bourbon Steak at Four Seasons Hotel, Washington, D.C.

Head bartender Torrence Swain serves fall-fruit-forward cocktails beside the fire pits on Bourbon Steak’s brick patio. Elementary apple this ain’t: the Pear Mon Frère combines Pear Calvados with apple cider, clove and cinnamon. “Pears and apples have similar profiles that work to complement each other—the clarity, purity, earthiness and slightly tart citrus taste make for a truly harmonious sip. The Pear Calvados is subtle and doesn’t overpower the notes of apple, creating a truly fantastic and slightly sweet blend of the harvest season fruits.” 960 1280

  

Fall Gimlet: Standby, Detroit

Fall Gimlet: Standby, Detroit

Opihr, a cardamom-heavy Oriental spiced gin, updates Raymond Chandler’s cocktail of choice (along with grapefruit sherbet, nutmeg, lime and salt) at Standby in Detroit. A “real gimlet,” as one of his characters noted in The Long Goodbye, “is half gin and half Rose’s lime juice and nothing else”—but this gimlet has character to carry it through a Michigan winter. 960 1280

  

Ain’t Nobody Got Thyme for That: Cook & Brown Public House, Providence, R.I.

Ain’t Nobody Got Thyme for That: Cook & Brown Public House, Providence, R.I.

Prepare to impress early fall cocktail-party guests by whipping up a batch of thyme simple syrup (bring equal parts granulated sugar and water to a simmer, add a few sprigs of thyme, remove from heat and steep for an hour); then shake ½ an ounce of said syrup with 1½ oz. Barr Hill gin, ¾ oz grapefruit juice, ¼ oz lemon juice and 3 dashes of grapefruit bitters, pour over ice in a Collins glass, then top with ginger beer. “This drink hits all the proper notes—acidic, slightly bitter, with a touch of savory sweetness that is rounded out by a ginger beer spiced finish,” Cook & Brown Public House beverage director Ryan Kennedy says. He uses Barr Hill Gin for its subtle honey notes, which “really start to evoke the upcoming longer nights but still remind you that summer was just a few weeks ago. This is as refreshing-early-fall as it gets.” 960 1280

  

Golden Fang: Death & Co, New York City

Golden Fang: Death & Co, New York City

In the Big Apple, nothing says “autumn” like a long, contemplative walk through Central Park, catching a subway train downtown and warming yourself with a roaring...tiki drink. With lime and orange juices, and a trio of tropical syrups (ginger, passionfruit and vanilla), this gin-based shared cocktail sounds like a stowaway from a more tropical place—but New York City is a melting pot, after all, and a scorpion bowl is a fine way to stave off the cold. The drink is finished with cardamom bitters and a showstopping dash of cinnamon that catches fire tableside: “What’s unique about the flame is that it’s not only the visual appeal, but when the grated cinnamon hits the flame, the toasted aroma really fills the room and enhances the entire olfactory experience of the cocktail,” Death & Co head bartender Tyson Buhler says. Vastly preferable to a Yankee Candle. 960 1280

  

Caribbean Milk Punch: Brennan’s, New Orleans

Caribbean Milk Punch: Brennan’s, New Orleans

Fall cocktails have a Caribbean flavor, in turn, for French Quarter brunchgoers at Brennan’s in New Orleans (where milk punch has been served for 70 years). With Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum, Maker’s Mark, heavy cream, vanilla and nutmeg, Caribbean milk punch anticipates (and is vastly superior to) the eggnog that’ll appear at holiday parties around the country a few months later. For another taste of New Orleans, try Ojen, a Jack-Maxwell-approved licorice liquor.  960 1280

  

The Phantom Regiment: Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, Nashville

The Phantom Regiment: Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, Nashville

Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery’s director of operations, James Henley, suggests “bringing the campfire to [your] cocktail” by using a smoky spirit (like mezcal or scotch), a smoked glass (a vessel that you’ve infused with aroma), or using a smoky ingredient—like Ancho Reyes, the smoked spice in the distillery’s Phantom Regiment, which also features Belle Meade Bourbon, Carpano Antica (an Italian vermouth), Nux Alpina Black Walnut liqueur, Angostura bitters and an absinthe rinse. “It’s like reading a mystery novel in a dimly lit study on a cool autumn night.” (Check out Jack Maxwell's visit to the distillery here.)  960 1280

  

Brute Force: The Dead Rabbit, New York City

Brute Force: The Dead Rabbit, New York City

Jillian Vose’s Brute Force at The Dead Rabbit is genteel and lethal in equal doses. Each well-mannered ingredient (like green-tea-infused Tapatio Blanco Tequila and Merlet Poire) has a counterpart with an ulterior motive (like Wray & Nephew overproof rum and two dashes of absinthe). Garnished with nutmeg, it’s a family holiday: sweet like your nana and sneaky like that uncle no one mentions. 960 1280

Brent Herrig  

Fig & Whiskey: Pizzeria Vetri, Washington D.C.

Fig & Whiskey: Pizzeria Vetri, Washington D.C.

With High West double rye whiskey, Amaro Della Sirene liqueur (which builds herbaceous flavor on a caramel base), fresh lime juice and fig-and-acacia-honey jam, the Fig & Whiskey at Pizzeria Vetri bids farewell to fig season, which winds down in October. “As we get into fall and the colder months, guests tend to enjoy warmer spirits—whiskey in particular. The jam presents texture along with some richer fall-type flavors,” beverage Manager Rah-Jah Kelly says. 960 1280

  

Pine Needle Margarita: Loa Bar, New Orleans

Pine Needle Margarita: Loa Bar, New Orleans

Loa Bar’s Pine Needle Margarita is, quite literally, a taste of New Orleans in the fall: “Spirit Handler” Alan Walter forages in City Park for ingredients like Spanish moss and pine needles that he cooks down à la minute for cocktails. This particular harvest features añejo tequila, pine needles, thyme, Cointreau, bay and sassafras. Jack's paid a visit to Loa Bar; click here to follow in his footsteps all over the city.   960 1280

Eugenia Uhl  

Falling in Love: Babbalucci, New York City

Falling in Love: Babbalucci, New York City

At Babbalucci on Harlem’s Lenox Avenue, bar manager Bruno Molfetta combines herbaceous Gin Mare with mild, sweet yellow Chartreuse, citrus, thyme and a red Bordeaux syrup; it’s the perfect cocktail for an autumn date night. 960 1280

  

Clarified Bloody Mary: Plum Bar, Oakland, California

Clarified Bloody Mary: Plum Bar, Oakland, California

Oakland's Plum Bar makes magic with jewel-bright local ingredients. Adam Chapman’s Clarified Bloody Mary starts with sea bean, a seaweed with a salty, acidic flavor; he pickles it lightly with vinegar and coriander, then combines it with barrel-aged Tito’s, Early Girl tomato, spices and black pepper oil. It’s quite possibly the loveliest Mary in town. 960 1280

  

Farnum Hill Ciders: Lebanon, N.H.

Farnum Hill Ciders: Lebanon, N.H.

“We’re trying to make cider that’s dry but has a very bright acidity and fruit for miles, with a tannic underpinning and a bright, clean, fruity finish,” explains Stephen Wood, co-proprietor of Farnum Hill (and a 2014 James Beard Award semifinalist). On the cidery’s Growler Days in September and October, visitors can stop by the cider room, purchase a glass jug for $3, and fill it with one of Farnum Hill’s kegged offerings for a mere $10; you’d be hard-pressed to find a finer celebration of fall.  960 1280

  

Virtue Cider: Fennville, Michigan

Virtue Cider: Fennville, Michigan

On Michigan’s Cider Coast, former Goose Island brewmaster Gregory Hall and co-founder Stephen Schmakel use traditional farmhouse production methods to produce European-style craft cider with fruit from local family farms. Virtue Cider’s tasting room, bottle shop and farm market are open every day; guests who are 21 and over can make reservations for a tour on Fridays, Saturdays or Sundays. The cidery’s cat is named Pippin, of course. 960 1280

  

Alpenfire Cider: Port Townsend, Washington

Alpenfire Cider: Port Townsend, Washington

Washington State’s first organic cidery welcomes humans and a fairly astonishing array of local creatures; Alpenfire’s orchard is cornered by mason bee houses and attracts wild birds, deer, coyote and bobcats (“along with the less welcome rabbits and voles”). The cidery’s tasting room is open on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays through December, and “visitors are always encouraged to visit the orchard and most of the production,” says cidery co-owner Nancy Bishop. “For serious tours we like to schedule ahead.” 960 1280

Jen Lee Chapman  

Albemarle CiderWorks: North Garden, Virginia

Albemarle CiderWorks: North Garden, Virginia

The orchardists at Albemarle CiderWorks draw inspiration from their love of vintage tree fruit varieties; they first planted an array of apples in 2000 and began fermenting and bottling ciders in 2009. On November 5th (for its Harvest Festival) and the 19th-20th (as an open house for Cider Week Virginia), Albemarle will be offering tours of its space; its tasting room, in turn, is open every day. 960 1280

  

Citizen Cider: Burlington, Vermont

Citizen Cider: Burlington, Vermont

Citizen Cider is making its way from Vermont across the country—it’s currently available in the eastern U.S. and heading west—but its cellar ciders are only available at its tasting room in Burlington. Citizen’s offerings range from limited-edition varietals like Northern Spy to the non-traditional ginger-and-lemon Dirty Mayor; all of the fruit in its ciders hail from local orchards. Citizen Cider’s Cheray MacFarland suggests pairing a glass with a local cheese: “Vermont-crafted cheeses are great on their own, but add our cider to the mix and it’s a solid winner.”  960 1280

  

AeppelTreow Winery & Distillery: Burlington, Wisconsin

AeppelTreow Winery & Distillery: Burlington, Wisconsin

At AeppelTreow, visitors are welcome to stop by and watch the cidermaking team work or to stroll through the orchards and picnic at their leisure, says ciderwright Charles McGonegal. AeppelTreow produces sparkling, draft, still and fortified cider, perry (that is, the pear analogue to cider), and whiskey and brandies; its tasting room offers a chance to try them all. Don’t let the sophisticated offerings lull you into a false sense of formality, though: “We’re located in a barn on an apple orchard, after all.” 960 1280

  

Argus Cidery: Austin, Texas

Argus Cidery: Austin, Texas

The Argus team began production in 2010 because they wanted to make the kind of cider they wanted to drink—that is, dry, bright and effervescent. They now produce small-format ciders with Washington State apples and large-format, limited-edition ciders with apples from southern orchards; none of their ciders are pasteurized or back-sweetened. The cidery’s tasting room offers weekend visitors both flights of its current pressings and a glimpse of what might crop up in future years. 960 1280

Max Photography  

Redbyrd Orchard Cider: Trumansburg, N.Y.

Redbyrd Orchard Cider: Trumansburg, N.Y.

If you run into Redbyrd’s co-founder Eric Schatt at the picturesque Finger Lakes Cider House (home to the fruits of five cideries’ labor), he’ll probably tell you to try the Cloudsplitter. “[It’s] a blend of our very favorite cider apples, mostly European bittersharps and sharps which gives the cider bright, vibrant acidity and plentiful tannins. Cloudsplitter is also a true expression of the terroir of our two hilltop orchard sites.” 960 1280

Jason Koski  

South Hill Cider: Ithaca, N.Y.

South Hill Cider: Ithaca, N.Y.

South Hill cidermaker Steve Selin produced 1,250 cases of cider last year with apples from his hilltop orchard—and apples from other small orchards, abandoned orchards and wild apples. His “Packbasket” cider gets its name from its harvest: “[W]e found one stand of wild trees in a high valley with a good crop. These hidden trees were far enough from the dirt road that we could only retrieve the fruit by hauling it out on our backs.” South Hill’s ciders are poured at the Finger Lakes Cider House and are available in New York and by mail.   960 1280

  

Black Apple Crossing: Springdale, Arkansas

Black Apple Crossing: Springdale, Arkansas

The Shiloh Museum of Ozark History—which happens to be down the street from Black Apple Crossing’s production facilities and tap room—helps its neighbors name their ciders.  They gave the 1904 its moniker as a nod to the World’s Fair held that year in St. Louis, where the Arkansas apple exhibit won 209 medals; the cider is an all-Ozark blend. As owner and cofounder Leo Orpin notes, northwestern Arkansas was once known as the “apple belt” of the United States; he and his partners are doing their part to bring the business back. 960 1280

  

Castle Hill Cider: Keswick, Virginia

Castle Hill Cider: Keswick, Virginia

A young Thomas Jefferson once frolicked at Castle Hill, where the tasting room serves ciders made on the property and visitors can retire with their beverages to an elegant octagonal porch. Castle Hill’s orchard is “only” 80 years old, but its Levity cider is fermented in kvevri (vessels that have been used in wine production since sixth century B.C.); all things considered, there’s a lot of history in Keswick. 960 1280

  

E.Z. Orchards: Salem, Oregon

E.Z. Orchards: Salem, Oregon

E.Z. Orchards has been growing apples in the Willamette Valley for nearly a century; its cidermaking, in turn, dates back to 2000, and the orchards now grow American, English and French heirloom cider apples. Visitors can stop by its farm market on Saturdays and Sundays, and orchardist and cidermaker Kevin Zielinski will be pouring cider at the Portland Nursery Apple Tasting Event on October 7-9 and 14-16. 960 1280

Good Beer Hunting (http://www.goodbeerhunting.com)  

B. Nektar Meadery: Ferndale, Michigan

B. Nektar Meadery: Ferndale, Michigan

B. Nektar is the largest meadery in the country; it’s also one of the most playful cideries out there. The 22 taps in the modern-industrial serving space just down the road from its production facilities feature everything from Zombie Killer, a cider with mouth-puckering tart cherry juice, to The Dude’s Rug, with seasonal spices that “really chai the room together”. For this year’s HallowMead costume party, the team will be blending The Dude’s Rug with pumpkin purée in its slushie machine. 960 1280

  

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